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Shasha sauce

Shasha sauce recipe

One of the main reasons I signed up for an Amazon Prime account when I moved to Texas was to give myself an uninterrupted pipeline to Stadium Mustard, a revered brown mustard only available for sale in the Northeast Ohio area. Not only is this surprisingly addictive (and well-named) condiment in high demand at stadiums across the United States, it has even been flown by special request (with special packaging) on three separate shuttle missions. This stuff was liquid gold and I had just moved into virgin territory.

Texans proved eager for something other than the yellow mustard schwag they were accustomed too, and I was more than happy to give it to them. With easy access to an almost endless supply of product, a very profitable but ruthless mustard ring soon sprang up in my garage*. It was a short and mildly sweet ride to the top — until Shasha sauce hit the streets and the bottom fell out of the underground mustard trade.

Made from hot banana peppers, Shasha sauce spread like wildfire through a community raised from birth on jalapeños and five-alarm chili. Needing to have more information on my competition, I cooked myself up a small batch. That first bite is a rush of intense flavor — not just heat — and feels like all your taste receptors are firing at once. Tangy; sweet; sour; and spicy with a pleasing blast of fiery heat, it will take your mouth a minute to sort everything out. And then you’ll want more. And more. And more. It was yellow crack. I immediately realized I had a pantry packed with product that wasn’t going to go anywhere and I haven’t really opened a Stadium Mustard since. Burgers, bratwurst, hot dogs, pulled pork and chicken sandwiches are all transformed by this amazing sauce, so if you only buy one jarred condiment under a bridge this year, make it this the one.

After making more than my fair share of Shasha sauce, I eventually decided I liked the somewhat brighter, fresher-tasting sauce that resulted from blending the jarred and fresh peppers together. On occasion, I’ve experimented with different amounts and ingredients: an extra tablespoon or so of the brine from the jarred banana peppers (inconclusive). Roasted garlic has made an appearance (a bit off) as have a few of the far more potent serrano peppers (too hot). I’ve even tried to combine it with Stadium Mustard in the Shasha sauce (don’t). Experiment on your own and see what you like best. If you hate it, I know a guy who get you some Stadium Mustard cheap.

Adapted (slightly) from Michael Symon’s recipe for shasha sauce.

*I haven’t actually done anything morally questionable with any condiment anywhere at anytime to anyone except that one time at Arby’s which was only half my fault.

Image: ForkingSpoon



Shasha sauce recipe

Yields16 Servings

A slightly altered recipe for Michael Symon's legendary Shasha sauce that is made with a blend of jarred and fresh banana peppers for a fresher taste.

Prep Time10 minsCook Time50 minsTotal Time1 hr

Ingredients

 6 ounces sliced banana peppers (about 1/2 a typical jar)
 2 fresh banana peppers, roughly chopped
 2 cloves garlic
 ½ cup yellow mustard
 ½ cup white vinegar
 ¼ cup sugar
 1 tablespoon flour
 ¼ cup water

Instructions

1

Puree the sauce ingredients
In a blender or food processor, puree the jarred peppers, fresh peppers, garlic, mustard and vinegar until the texture is smooth. Removing the ribs and seeds from the fresh peppers will lower the heat of the sauce and result in a slightly smoother texture. Optionally, you can also add 1 tablespoon of the jarred banana pepper brine to the blender as well.

2

Cook the sauce
In a large nonreactive saucepan over high heat, add the sugar to the pepper puree and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 30 minutes.

3

Finish the sauce
In a small bowl, whisk together the flour and the water to make a smooth paste. Whisk the paste into the pepper puree and simmer for an additional 20 minutes, stirring frequently until the sauce thickens to the desired consistency. Let the sauce cool, and transfer to nonreactive containers (Mason jars are ideal). Store the sauce in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 month.


Notes

Shasha sauce shouldn't be confused with sha cha sauce which is an Asian/Polynesian condiment that is also made with garlic and chilis but with the addition of soybean oil, shallots, brill fish and dried shrimp.

Ingredients

 6 ounces sliced banana peppers (about 1/2 a typical jar)
 2 fresh banana peppers, roughly chopped
 2 cloves garlic
 ½ cup yellow mustard
 ½ cup white vinegar
 ¼ cup sugar
 1 tablespoon flour
 ¼ cup water

Directions

1

Puree the sauce ingredients
In a blender or food processor, puree the jarred peppers, fresh peppers, garlic, mustard and vinegar until the texture is smooth. Removing the ribs and seeds from the fresh peppers will lower the heat of the sauce and result in a slightly smoother texture. Optionally, you can also add 1 tablespoon of the jarred banana pepper brine to the blender as well.

2

Cook the sauce
In a large nonreactive saucepan over high heat, add the sugar to the pepper puree and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 30 minutes.

3

Finish the sauce
In a small bowl, whisk together the flour and the water to make a smooth paste. Whisk the paste into the pepper puree and simmer for an additional 20 minutes, stirring frequently until the sauce thickens to the desired consistency. Let the sauce cool, and transfer to nonreactive containers (Mason jars are ideal). Store the sauce in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 month.

Shasha sauce


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